2018 round-up | help @reproutopia eat on tour

Gentle reader,

I’m writing several things at the moment: about care; about xenofeminism; about ectogenesis; and about disaster communism and cyborg ecology. Next week, my take on Kristen Ghodsee’s (terrible, in my opinion) Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism will go live at The New Inquiry, and I will be talking about amniotechnics over the telephone to a telephone-based gallery event in Nottingham about ‘Matter in Flux‘.

Most excitingly: this year, on May 7th, my book launches – you can read the blurb from Donna Haraway (!) here – and you can pre-order it (or leave a customer review – much appreciated, btw) here in the sprawling maw of the Bezos empire. Asking for money may be ubiquitous now, but it’s still awkward, so I’ll cut to the chase: if you’re in a position to organize a fabulous and at least somewhat paid event, or to support my book tour in May in any other way, really, please be in touch. Consider clicking below to PayPal me or patreon-ize me, or buy me a gift card for groceries (helping me save up for the trip).

Your money will help me travel – where small, wonderful, radical organizations don’t have enough money to allow me to do so – which means I’ll be able to present my manifesto for trans-inclusive gestational justice and family abolition all over the world, combating SWERFs and TERFs (and SERFs!) and learning from reproductive utopians of every ilk. As detailed in my 2018 round-up twitter thread (copied below), I am in a juicy and creative spell with my writing, but my income sources right now are still extremely erratic. I would like to be able to say ‘yes’ to the invitations I’ve received.

So, many thanks in advance for your solidarity and pecuniary largesse. And, as always, thanks for reading.

love,

Sophie

supporting Sophie’s book tour

$25.00

Continue reading

Article at The New Socialist

“Labour does you”: Might thinking through pregnancy as work help us radicalise the politics of care?

I’ve never known anyone to disagree with the old saying ‘it takes a village to raise a child.’ Yet this general approval of the distributed, collaborative character of the work of parenting does not frequently carry over—for some reason—to the question of making a baby. In my forthcoming book Full Surrogacy Now, I look at the gestational surrogacy industry politically and think speculatively about how to abolish actually-existing pregnancy (both waged and unwaged) as a form of capitalist work. I defend the utopian position that infants don’t belong to anybody but, rather, belong to everybody: they will belong only to themselves, in the phrase of the Sisterhood of Black Single Mothers. Nothing new, then: feminists and queers have mounted uncompromising assaults on the institution of the family for well over a century. However, wherever I’ve presented it, I’ve noticed that this call for family abolition, which I root in the Black-lesbian Marxist-feminist critique of kinship and the gender binary, appears rather contentious. It seems my proposition that the complicatedness of pregnancy itself might be a useful heuristic for complicating the politics of ‘care’ (and replacing kinship with comradeliness is, for some, a tough one to swallow. Why is this? Why, in other words, is a blog-post entitled ‘Gestators of all Genders, Unite!’ or the statement ‘The gender of gestating is ambiguous’ still guaranteed to scandalise not only Angela Nagle, but most cisgender feminists? These are some of the questions I want to persuade you it is important for anti-capitalists to pose.

Read the rest of this piece at The New Socialist, where it was commissioned by the most excellent Josie Moore (@ofthesparrows), who happens to be the author of this piece I found very rewarding, on journalist Andrew O’Hagan’s appalling book-length coverage for the LRB of the mass murder that was Grenfell Tower.

The editors at The New Socialist even generously included me in the Editors’ Selection for 2018. I’m in illustrious and radical company there, so check it out.